Blind Taxpayer Definition

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Blind Taxpayer Definition

What Is a Blind Taxpayer?

A blind taxpayer is any individual in the United States whose loss of vision qualifies them for an unique tax deduction reserved for the blind. Blind taxpayers are entitled to the same basic deductions as taxpayers over the age of 65.

The increased amount of the blind taxpayer deduction for persons filing as single in 2020 is $1,650. The extra deduction was $1,300 for married couples filing jointly with one blind spouse. The increased deduction for both blind spouses was $2,600.

Filers should tick the box to the left of the Standard Deduction- Age Blindness heading for blind taxpayers. Because a blind taxpayer receives a deduction in addition to the standard deduction, they must file on form 1040 or 1040 SR.

Key Takeaways

  • A blind taxpayer is any individual in the United States whose loss of vision qualifies them for an unique tax deduction reserved for the blind.
  • Blind taxpayers are entitled to the same basic deductions as taxpayers over the age of 65.
  • The increased amount of the blind taxpayer deduction for persons filing as single in 2020 is $1,650.

Understanding Blind Taxpayer

Blind taxpayer status is only applicable to those who take the standard deduction. The extra deduction is not available to taxpayers who itemize their deductions.

The IRS defines blind taxpayers in Publication 501. Taxpayers who are partially blind must attach a note from their doctor saying that they cannot see better than 20/200 out of their better eye even with glasses or contacts, or that their field of vision is 20 degrees or less. If the taxpayer’s eyesight will never improve, no more letters are required, and just a reference to the first letter must be included with future tax returns. Otherwise, each year, the IRS demands a fresh letter.

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According to the IRS definition of a blind taxpayer, visual status is determined at the end of the calendar year. The higher deduction for blindness is available to all taxpayers, regardless of age. The monetary boost is the same for both partly and completely blind taxpayers.

History of Blind Taxpayer

The Social Security Act of 1935 established financial aid for the blind. This was most likely attributable to an increase in the number of blind persons in the nation as a result of disabled WWI soldiers coming home from the war. In 1940, the National Federation of the Blind was founded.

Tax relief for the blind helps to offset some of the expenses connected with their blindness. For example, blind persons often reside near their places of work to make commuting easier, resulting in greater housing expenses. Some people also need assistants like as readers, guides, and service animals, which raises their living expenses.

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